As I’m currently working on applying to PhD programs after my MFA in translation at Iowa, I wanted to compile the info I’ve been learning about potential schooling in translation after the MFA. The premise of the post being, of course, that the University of Iowa Comp Lit PhD program is incredibly receptive to creative translation projects& a wonderful environment for scholar/translators, and this seems to make it a glowing exception in the grad school firmament. I’ll keep on adding to this post when I come across new info. that might be of use to others.

-dt

UC Irvine/Comp Lit (woah):

The Schaeffer Fellowship provides $20,000 plus fee remission for 2 years to Ph.D. students in Comparative Literature for whom translation will be a crucial element of dissertation work. Students translating literary or historical texts or archival materials not previously reliably available in English as part of their dissertation research are eligible. Multiple fellowships per year may be awarded. Please contact the Department in advance if you are interested in the Schaeffer Fellowship.

*though it seems, from my unnamed source at Irvine, that creative translation is still viewed as second to theory in the program*

And, from a little legwork (though not much) it seems that the comp lit programs at Brown, University of Michigan, Princeton and Columbia are all fairly sturdy locations of translation studies. more to come.

The Art of Translation

November 23, 2008

NPR‘s All Things Considered broadcast a story on literary translation this afternoon. It’s fairly basic to anyone who’s even dabbled in translation, but it’s been great to see the field getting more attention in the past few months. The version translated from a radio broadcast into an online article even includes a little fragment of Hugo to present the idea of comparative translation. Maybe this means that awareness of translation is really taking hold, as an important facet of how we learn about the world.

-ar

Translation-related articles culled from Silliman’s amazing, expansive blog:

A Clayton Eshleman Reader is out with Black Widow Press , Ron Silliman reviews it on his blog.

Additionally, here’s a post about translating procedural poetry which takes the old form v. content question into the newer realm of procedural (rule-based, Oulipian) poetics. Blogger Francois Luong praises Cole Swensen’s translation of Pierre Alferi, which gives him points in our book.

and, just for fun: Russian Avant-garde books digitized at the Getty. They’re wild!

Brian and Theo get pumped for the new issue.  Theo is the little one.

Brian and Theo Goedde get pumped for the new issue. Theo is the little one.


Natasa Durovicova (of 91st Meridian/IWP fame) and Theo get acquainted.  Theo was born on the day of the last eXchanges launch (Silence&Song) to then-editor Emily Goedde. He sort of upstaged the last party, but we forgive him 'cause he's family.

Natasa Durovicova (of 91st Meridian/IWP fame) and Theo get acquainted. Theo was born on the day of the last eXchanges launch (Silence&Song) to then-editor Emily Goedde. He sort of upstaged the last party, but we forgive him 'cause he's family.


Andrea Rosenberg and Mary Bryant, our fearless editors and gracious hostesses for the evening

Andrea Rosenberg and Mary Bryant, our fearless editors and gracious hostesses for the evening

Emily Goedde reads her translations of Chinese poet Zhu Shuzhen

Emily Goedde reads from her translations of 12th century Chinese poet Zhu Shuzhen

Diana Thow reads her translations of Amelia Rosselli

Diana Thow reads her translations from the Italian of poet Amelia Rosselli

Puja entertains with her translation from the Hindi of an essay by Suryabala

Puja Birla entertains with her translation of an essay by Suryabala (in which Hindi is both the original language & protagonist)

Thanks to all for a great issue& great party! Keep an eye out for eXchanges Spring 2009 issue: Mirrors&Masks (more info TK)

new issue of eXchanges

November 20, 2008

So this is shameless self-promotion, I know. But eXchanges is launching its new issue, Roots & Branches, today and we’d love to share it with everyone! Read it on our website at www.uiowa.edu/~xchanges/

Our launch party is tonight, too, so if you are in the area, please stop in. It’s at 8pm in Shambaugh House at 430 N. Clinton Street in Iowa City. Puja Birla and two former editors of eXchanges, Emily Goedde and Diana Thow will be reading their translations, published in this issue.

We’ll also be celebrating the new designation of Iowa City as the third UNESCO City of Literature! (See our previous post for more)
-mb

Big news day: UNESCO has named Iowa City a City of Literature (joining the ranks of Edinburgh and Melbourne). Congrats and thanks to all who worked hard to make this happen!

more info from the UI press release:

The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) has designated Iowa City, Iowa, the world’s third City of Literature, making the community part of the UNESCO Creative Cities Network.

“This is at once a celebration of the literary riches and resources of Iowa City and a spur to action,” said University of Iowa International Writing Program Director Christopher Merrill, who led the UI Writing University committee that submitted the city’s proposal. “We look forward to working with our new partners in the Creative Cities network — to forging dynamic relationships with writers, artists and others committed to the life of discovery. This is a great day for Iowa City.”

Iowa City joins Edinburgh, Scotland, and Melbourne, Australia, as UNESCO Cities of Literature. Other cities in the Creative Cities Network — honoring and connecting cultural centers for cinema, music, crafts and folk arts, design, media arts and gastronomy, as well as literature — include Aswan, Egypt; Santa Fe, N.M.; Berlin, Germany; Montreal, Canada; Popayan, Colombia; Bologna, Italy; Shenzhen, China; and Seville, Spain.

read more here.